Browse Prior Art Database

Message Services on a Text Processor Display Related to Partitioned Foreground Functions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046140D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Petersen, GS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The preceding article relates to the partitioning of foreground task on a text processing display terminal. The present expedient illustrates how a single message line may be utilized to give messages relating to both partitions. However, the present system further provides for a situation wherein the partitioned foreground tasks are used in an environment wherein the text processor switches between data processing and text processing sessions (it is in these latter text processing sessions that the above-referenced partitioning occurs). To illustrate the operation in accordance with the present system, let us assume that in a text processing display terminal which is capable of switching between text processing and data processing sessions, we have in effect a text processing session which is partitioned.

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Message Services on a Text Processor Display Related to Partitioned Foreground Functions

The preceding article relates to the partitioning of foreground task on a text processing display terminal. The present expedient illustrates how a single message line may be utilized to give messages relating to both partitions. However, the present system further provides for a situation wherein the partitioned foreground tasks are used in an environment wherein the text processor switches between data processing and text processing sessions (it is in these latter text processing sessions that the above-referenced partitioning occurs). To illustrate the operation in accordance with the present system, let us assume that in a text processing display terminal which is capable of switching between text processing and data processing sessions, we have in effect a text processing session which is partitioned. We will then deal with how a single message line may be utilized.

Let us consider some of the problems associated with immediate and queued messages.

For Immediate Messages in Con

.IN 5 There are applications that issue a large number of immediate messages which would overflow the message buffer if we tried to queue them when an application does not have access to the display, e.g., a data processor. On the other hand, there are immediate messages which solicit input from the operator. This prevents us from throwing away all immediate messages issued from applications when they do not have access to the display/keyboard. In addition, there are applications which issue beeps with their immediate message. It was considered unacceptable to have beeps occur without the associated message. Applications that take down their own immediate messages could inadvertently take down the immediate message of another application which currently had access to the display. Finally, the message service has no way of distinguishing such immediate messages.

For Queued Messages in Conventional Sy

.IN 5 There are messages that solicit operator input from the keyboard which would have to be serviced only when the application issuing the message had access to the display/keyboard. In addition, there are priority messages that solicit operator input from the keyboard while there are other priority messages that require immediate operator action.

In order to deal with the above situations, in the present system, message services wil...