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Distributed Processing Approach to Industrial Automation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046153D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davis, GT: AUTHOR

Abstract

The IBM Series/l computer is utilized as a host for remote programmable controllers for industrial automation applications. Such systems not only benefit from the computer power and storage capacity of a host Series/l central processing unit (CPU), but also make use of remotely connected controllers to realize a distributed processing approach to industrial automation.

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Distributed Processing Approach to Industrial Automation

The IBM Series/l computer is utilized as a host for remote programmable controllers for industrial automation applications. Such systems not only benefit from the computer power and storage capacity of a host Series/l central processing unit (CPU), but also make use of remotely connected controllers to realize a distributed processing approach to industrial automation.

The remotely connected controllers extend the Series/l input/output handling capabilities for industrial automation applications by placing most of the control functions in these attachments rather than in the CPU. The CPU can then handle more processes, as well as background tasks. The remote controllers are interfaced to the Series/l via a ring architecture. This feature allows the controllers to be distributed in remote locations, thus reducing cabling problems for the user and making the system more responsive to individual applications. An additional benefit of the ring architecture is to allow direct communications between a pair of the remote controllers without the intervention of the Series/l CPU, further enhancing the capabilities of the Series/l CPU to do background tasks.

The controllers at the remote nodes of the network can be designed to solve a variety of applications now filled by programmable controllers, custom hardware and microprocessor designs, and standard minicomputer configurations, and provides significant cost and/or performance advantages over these available alternatives.

In fact, as shown in the drawing, a single Series/1 host computer 1 controls more than one process simultaneously. One large task (PROCESS #1) can be controlled with a single ring netw...