Browse Prior Art Database

Versatile Keyboard for a Programmable Elevator System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046175D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arter, NK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A programmed elevator keyboard is described which can be easily retrofitted to existing elevator systems and which provides complete versatility not found in present-day keyboards.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Versatile Keyboard for a Programmable Elevator System

A programmed elevator keyboard is described which can be easily retrofitted to existing elevator systems and which provides complete versatility not found in present-day keyboards.

Elevator programming is an old art. Early systems were programmed with relays. As the number of floors and the number of elevators in a single building increased, the number of relays required for complete programming became an inhibiting factor to completely programmable systems. The advent of digital logic and the development of the integrated circuit advanced the art of elevator programming, but the greatest advance has come with the development of the microprocessor.

In large buildings with many elevators, there were elevators designated for certain groups of floors and were usually called "express" elevators. The programming usually controlled the waiting point, the number of times the express elevator would return to the ground floor, and the response to a request from a floor. Extensive statistical studies were made to ascertain the optimal operations of the elevators. Since the same elevators served the same floors, the number of buttons required for selecting floors was limited and the buttons were permanently labelled. There was no need in the early systems to alter the floor associated with a particular button.

As programming techniques became more sophisticated, the objective of elevator assignments became more generalized and it was no longer desirable to limit the service of a single elevator to a single group of floors. Studies...