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Tip Configurations for Microwelding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046210D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lakritz, MN: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

One microweld process employs an electrical discharge between a laminated pair of small rectangular tips separated by a l-mil gap. The tips are in contact with the wire to be joined, and during the process the wire is melted and solidified, reflecting the shape of the tip used, as shown in Figs. lA-1D. One tip employed has the simple configuration shown in Fig. l, which was found to have problems of low pull strengths particularly in the extreme case of hot bonds which happened occasionally.

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Tip Configurations for Microwelding

One microweld process employs an electrical discharge between a laminated pair of small rectangular tips separated by a l-mil gap. The tips are in contact with the wire to be joined, and during the process the wire is melted and solidified, reflecting the shape of the tip used, as shown in Figs. lA-1D. One tip employed has the simple configuration shown in Fig. l, which was found to have problems of low pull strengths particularly in the extreme case of hot bonds which happened occasionally.

Also, because of the high stresses at contact d, the tip life was low. These problems can be resolved by this design which provides long tip life and high pull strength bonds.

First the weak bond heel area C (Fig. 1D) was eliminated by slanting the lever arm approximately as shown in Fig. 2, which results in the slanting of the contact of the tip to wire. This could also be accomplished by honing the tip at the angle shown. The result after the bond is made is more material at the bond heel, thus strengthening the bonds. This results in the elimination of low bond strength welds. Alternatively, this can be accomplished by shaping the tip with a variable width gap, as shown in Fig. 3. These new tips also include a wedge in the gap area, as shown in Fig. 4, which eliminates the high stress on the inside of the tip and increases tip life.

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