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New Gettering Process Using Laser-Induced Damage Plus Internal Oxygen Precipitation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046213D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schwuttke, GH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A new gettering process using laser-induced damage (LID) plus internal oxygen precipitation is described. In this process, LID is applied before chem-mech polishing and LID grooves are formed. Subsequently, the wafer is annealed at a temperature between 600 and 900C. As a result of the annealing, dislocations initiate from the LID sites and form dislocation networks in the wafer backsides. In addition, interaction between LID and oxygen during annealing causes the formation of a damage zone rich in oxygen nuclei. Subsequently, the LID grooves are removed by chem-mech polishing. The final result is a wafer which contains a damage zone containing a dislocation network and oxygen nuclei in the wafer backside as well as oxygen nuclei in the bulk and in the front surface.

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New Gettering Process Using Laser-Induced Damage Plus Internal Oxygen Precipitation

A new gettering process using laser-induced damage (LID) plus internal oxygen precipitation is described. In this process, LID is applied before chem-mech polishing and LID grooves are formed.

Subsequently, the wafer is annealed at a temperature between 600 and 900C. As a result of the annealing, dislocations initiate from the LID sites and form dislocation networks in the wafer backsides. In addition, interaction between LID and oxygen during annealing causes the formation of a damage zone rich in oxygen nuclei. Subsequently, the LID grooves are removed by chem-mech polishing. The final result is a wafer which contains a damage zone containing a dislocation network and oxygen nuclei in the wafer backside as well as oxygen nuclei in the bulk and in the front surface. Subsequent hot processing leads to out-diffusion of front surface oxygen and generates a defect-free zone. The oxygen nuclei in the bulk and the damage zone in the backside provide exceptional gettering capability.

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