Browse Prior Art Database

Ink to Paper Lubricant

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046242D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Findlay, HT: AUTHOR

Abstract

Printing ribbons having a solid ink layer may be fed in contact with the paper being printed upon. The ribbon may extend around a printhead having a matrix of wires, thermal electrodes, or the like to print the solid ink (such as by impact transfer from wires or melting by electrodes). Where the ribbon is not fed at the same speed as printhead movement, a frictional drag normally appears between the ribbon and the paper. To effectively eliminate that drag, a minute coating of polyfluoroethylene, graphite, polyethylene, or a similar solid lubricant ¹s applied as an outer layer on the ink.

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Ink to Paper Lubricant

Printing ribbons having a solid ink layer may be fed in contact with the paper being printed upon. The ribbon may extend around a printhead having a matrix of wires, thermal electrodes, or the like to print the solid ink (such as by impact transfer from wires or melting by electrodes). Where the ribbon is not fed at the same speed as printhead movement, a frictional drag normally appears between the ribbon and the paper. To effectively eliminate that drag, a minute coating of polyfluoroethylene, graphite, polyethylene, or a similar solid lubricant 1s applied as an outer layer on the ink.

The lubricant is applied during manufacture of the ribbon as a dry powder and buffed mechanically. All excess-free material is removed. The remaining coating is undetectable by common optical or weighing techniques. Ribbon so treated is moved smoothly and steadily by typical printer ribbon feed mechanisms even though in pressure contact with conventional paper at the printhead.

Specifically, FLUO HTG* polyfluoroethylene powder is used having a maximum particle size of 9 microns and an average particle size of 2 microns. The ink layer may be a pigmented organic resin or a wax-based solid.

* Trademark of Micro Powders, Inc.

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