Browse Prior Art Database

Transfer Board

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046250D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Loung, T: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The principle of the invention is illustrated in the above sequence of illustrations. In Fig. l, a side view of a mechanical relay 2 is shown which has eight pins 3, shown in the bottom view of Fig. 2. Mechanical relays are conventionally used in semiconductor testing for multiplexing signals during LSI (large-scale integration) testing. Oftentimes, it is desirable to substitute a solid-state relay for a mechanical relay because mechanical relays tend to have relay chatter which can interfere with some LSI testing operations. Although it is desirable to be able to easily interchange between a mechanical relay and a solid-state relay, in practice it becomes difficult to carry out the change because of incompatible pin patterns. As can be seen in Fig.

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Transfer Board

The principle of the invention is illustrated in the above sequence of illustrations. In Fig. l, a side view of a mechanical relay 2 is shown which has eight pins 3, shown in the bottom view of Fig. 2. Mechanical relays are conventionally used in semiconductor testing for multiplexing signals during LSI (large-scale integration) testing. Oftentimes, it is desirable to substitute a solid- state relay for a mechanical relay because mechanical relays tend to have relay chatter which can interfere with some LSI testing operations. Although it is desirable to be able to easily interchange between a mechanical relay and a solid-state relay, in practice it becomes difficult to carry out the change because of incompatible pin patterns. As can be seen in Fig. 3, the mechanical relay 2 has its pins 3 plugged into a socket 4 which is mounted on the pin electronics board 5. The socket 4 has the same pin pattern of eight pins as is shown in the bottom view for the mechanical relay pins of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 illustrates a side view of a solid-state relay 6 which has typically a total of l4 pins whose pattern is illustrated in the bottom view of the solid-state relay shown in Fig. 5. It can be seen that the solid-state relay 6 cannot be simply substituted for the mechanical relay 2 because of the difference in the pin pattern.

This problem is solved by the transfer board 8 which is shown in use in the side view of Fig. 6. The transfer board has pins 9 mounted thereto which are in the same pattern as are the pins 3 from the mechanical relay 2, so as to ena...