Browse Prior Art Database

Protective Layer for Resist Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046319D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hatzakis, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Use of a transparent thin polymer overcoat on top of siloxane resists is proposed to eliminate adverse effects due to the "stickiness" of siloxane. The transparent film is chosen such that it does not intermix with the siloxane and can be readily removed.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Protective Layer for Resist Materials

Use of a transparent thin polymer overcoat on top of siloxane resists is proposed to eliminate adverse effects due to the "stickiness" of siloxane. The transparent film is chosen such that it does not intermix with the siloxane and can be readily removed.

Some resist materials (for example, siloxane) which have excellent sensitivity and developing properties also have an adhesive or sticky surface, even after being properly baked. This property makes these resist materials unattractive for application where a mask is brought into contact or near contact with the surface due to possible damage to the mask. Furthermore, defect density would be expected to be large due to dust particles adhering to the surface. A new protective surface could be obtained by depositing (spinning, evaporation, etc.) a relatively thin layer of the proper material onto the sticky resist surface. This material could be any polymer or resist material (such as polymethylmethacrylate) which has good surface properties. The protective layer may be removed during ordinary developing or, if necessary, could be plasma or reactive ion etched. The protective layer should be chosen so as not to mix (or react) with the bottom resist layer in an adverse manner. A layer of pyralene was found to be adequate to protect the masks during a contact print exposure. A 2000 layer of pyralene was easily removed during development.

1