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Magneto-Stylus Printer Matrix-Addressing Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046331D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keefe, GE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Magneto-stylus printing depends on the toner being acted on by coincident magnetic and capacitive forces. If these forces can be independently controlled, then a matrix-addressing scheme can be designed. One such design is as follows:

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Magneto-Stylus Printer Matrix-Addressing Design

Magneto-stylus printing depends on the toner being acted on by coincident magnetic and capacitive forces. If these forces can be independently controlled, then a matrix-addressing scheme can be designed. One such design is as follows:

Use a print head in which its electric and magnetic functions have been separated into two components. In this case, the electric function is accomplished by striplines and the magnetic function (toner chaining) by a magnetically responsive bar transverse to the striplines. When both the electric and magnetic components are actuated, printing will occur at their intersection. Matrix address can be accomplished by segmenting the bar and controlling toner chaining in each segment. The striplines are arranged so that common areas in each segment are simultaneously electrically energized. Thus, the number of print voltage drivers are inversely proportional to the number of segments.

Examples of the segmented bar concept are shown in Figs. 1 and 2. In Fig. 1, a rotating magnet 20 is located above a pair of coupled magnetic bars 2l and 22 which surround a pair of conductors 23 and 24, respectively, which are connected by leads to current sources Ia and Ib, respectively, which produce magnetic fields in the magnetic bars, as shown. Toner particles 25 are shown on the insulating layer 35 below conductor elements of a conductor array 27 with a printed line of toner particles 26 shown where the printer has provided forces tending to transfer toner particles onto the transfer medium l9 composed of receptor conductor 29 and insulator layer 35. Individual conductors in array 27 are connected to sources 28, only one of which is shown to produce electronic signals or pulses for actuating printing at a given site as in the case of line 26 for conductor 2' in array 27.

Fig. 2 is a modification of Fig. 1 with a modified pair of magnetic bar segments 31 and 32 in the form of an array of connected horseshoe magnets connected into a comb-like structure. A pair of rotating bar magnets 30 are placed above the segments 31 and 32. The coils 33 and 34 are wrapped about the segments 31 and 32 to energize them magnetically with the vertical magnetization line shown on the segment 31 extending downwardly towards the medium 19, by the current sources Ia and Ib connected to lines to coils 33 and
34. In this case the conductor 2 in array 27 is activated to print line 37 of particles 26.

In Fig. 1, toner chains are set up by the field from the rotating magnet 20 closing thro...