Browse Prior Art Database

Thermal Integration Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046352D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schierhorst, AE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Conventional thermal printers employ thin film multi-element print heads to form images on thermally sensitive paper by applying short pulses of heat to the paper as the paper is fed past the head. Duty cycle restrictions on the pulsed heating and cooling of the head elements restrict the printing speed to less than 500 lines per minute.

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Thermal Integration Printer

Conventional thermal printers employ thin film multi-element print heads to form images on thermally sensitive paper by applying short pulses of heat to the paper as the paper is fed past the head. Duty cycle restrictions on the pulsed heating and cooling of the head elements restrict the printing speed to less than 500 lines per minute.

Apparatus shown in the figure raises this speed limit by using a thermal integration technique in which an intermediate heat storage medium receives the heat and transfers it to the paper continuously while the paper is being fed through its feed path. The intermediate medium receives the heat, in short duty cycle bursts, from a high intensity source (e.g., a laser) and transfers the heat to points on the paper over periods longer than the pulse duty cycle of the source, thereby exerting integrated heating effects on those portions of the paper at which the image is to be formed.

Referring to the figure, paper l fed from supply roll 2 passes over drum 3 where it travels in proximity to and at the same speed as heat-absorbing web 4. Web 4 receives heat, in image-formed pulsations, from a deflected or modulated laser source 5 which scans orthogonally to the direction of web/paper motion. The paper passes in proximity to the web over a planar area 6 which is chosen to provide a suitable integration time. The web is endless, and its length is chosen to ensure cooling of heated portions of the web before th...