Browse Prior Art Database

Thermal Integration Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046353D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schierhorst, AE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Conventional thermal printers apply short duration pulses of heat energy to thermally sensitive paper as the paper passes a stationary heating station. The time required to form marking impressions at the heating station restricts the printing speed. The technique described below allows for faster thermal printing.

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Thermal Integration Printer

Conventional thermal printers apply short duration pulses of heat energy to thermally sensitive paper as the paper passes a stationary heating station. The time required to form marking impressions at the heating station restricts the printing speed. The technique described below allows for faster thermal printing.

As shown in the figure, thermal printing paper 1, which contains a dielectric coating, is fed from a supply roll 2 through an electrical imaging station 3 and an integrating heating path 4 to exit rollers 5. At the imaging station, print head 6 forms selectively patterned electrostatic charges in the dielectric coating of the passing paper. Drum or shoe 7 provides a ground return path for the inductive charging operation. After receiving the charge, the paper passes through developing assembly 8 at which absorbing powder 9 adheres by electrostatic attraction to the charged areas on the paper. The paper then passes over revolving drum 10 which travels with the paper and supports it while the paper is being irradiated by energy source 11. The speed of the paper is such that the amount of energy received while it is passing source 11 is insufficient per se to cause marking. However, energy is absorbed by the electrostatically adhered powder and continuously transferred to the paper while the paper is traversing the "integrating path" 12. The energy from source 11 also neutralizes the charges on the paper surface, but the powder...