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Method of Sintering Large, Flat, Single Green Sheets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046394D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eggerding, CL: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique has been previously described for fabricating a multilayer module using a totally thin-film approach. Individual sheets of fused quartz are used as the base on which the metals are evaporated. Holes can be laser drilled through the fused quartz for via connections. Such a technology has some long term attractiveness; however, ceramic materials other than glasses would be desirable. To form a large base of a crystalline material, one would have to either grow a large single crystal and cut it to proper size, or attempt to sinter a ceramic composition to yield a large (greater than 50 mm linear dimension), thin (250 microns or less) base. Prior attempts at forming large, thin single sheets by sintering have not been successful because the material will curl at the edges and will be extremely cambered.

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Method of Sintering Large, Flat, Single Green Sheets

A technique has been previously described for fabricating a multilayer module using a totally thin-film approach. Individual sheets of fused quartz are used as the base on which the metals are evaporated. Holes can be laser drilled through the fused quartz for via connections. Such a technology has some long term attractiveness; however, ceramic materials other than glasses would be desirable. To form a large base of a crystalline material, one would have to either grow a large single crystal and cut it to proper size, or attempt to sinter a ceramic composition to yield a large (greater than 50 mm linear dimension), thin (250 microns or less) base. Prior attempts at forming large, thin single sheets by sintering have not been successful because the material will curl at the edges and will be extremely cambered. A potential method eliminating the camber is to use hot pressing; however, this is an expensive process, and the formation of thin samples is very difficult. Described here is a technique for making large, thin and flat sintered sheets without resorting to hot pressing.

The proposed technique requires the use of two or more ceramic compositions that are individually tape cast to form green sheets. One ceramic composition is capable of being fully densified at the sintering temperature used. The second composition does not sinter at the temperature used, and does not react with the first ceramic composition. A laminate is formed using the two green-sheet comp...