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Browse Prior Art Database

Rotating Shaft Electrical Contact

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046449D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bush, HG: AUTHOR

Abstract

One problem with low voltage electrical contacts utilized in conjunction with a rotating shaft is the ability of the system to create enough pressure to insure minimal contact resistance. Conventionally the contact resistance is held low by employing a wiper which is loaded against the shaft with a spring, or by utilizing a housing which provides the necessary spring pressure. Illustrated is a low-cost method of creating a rotating shaft electrical contactor which provides a low resistance pathway for current to one pole of a power supply, for example, ground.

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Rotating Shaft Electrical Contact

One problem with low voltage electrical contacts utilized in conjunction with a rotating shaft is the ability of the system to create enough pressure to insure minimal contact resistance. Conventionally the contact resistance is held low by employing a wiper which is loaded against the shaft with a spring, or by utilizing a housing which provides the necessary spring pressure. Illustrated is a low-cost method of creating a rotating shaft electrical contactor which provides a low resistance pathway for current to one pole of a power supply, for example, ground.

Turning now to the figure, a rotating shaft electrical wiping contactor 10 which creates its own spring force as an integral part of the wiper is illustrated. As shown, the contactor 10 includes a plurality of fingers 11, 12 and 13 with adjacent fingers being formed as at 11a, 12a and 13a to generally conform to the contour of the shaft 15. It has been found that if the preassembly internal diameter, i.e., the diameter of adjacent formed parts, is approximately one-half the diameter of the shaft 15, depending upon material thickness, enough spring contact is provided to insure a good low resistance electrical contact. Of course, the preformed portions 11a-13a are such that the wipers will "snap-on" the shaft, making for ease of assembly. Moreover, by splitting the fingers out of the stock material far enough back, over-stressing of the material of the contactor is inhibited...