Browse Prior Art Database

CVD Growth of Silicon Using Higher-Order Silanes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046537D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Green, DC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In the growth of epitaxial silicon using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), reduced growth temperatures and/or higher growth rates will minimize autodoping, interface variations, and the resulting degradation of device performance. Higher growth rates and lower temperature processing can be achieved using higher-order silane source gases, such as disilane Si2H6 . Fig. 1 shows a horizontal, inductively heated, air-cooled, CVD quartz reactor 8 which is conventionally used for the deposition of epitaxial and polycrystalline silicon from monosilane (SiH4) in a hydrogen carrier gas. Typically, SiH4 diluted to 0.01-0.1 vol% in H2 is passed over the Si substrates 10 located on susceptor 12 at total flows f=1-10 P/min and pressure p=1 atm. An RF coil 14 surrounds quartz tube 8.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

CVD Growth of Silicon Using Higher-Order Silanes

In the growth of epitaxial silicon using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), reduced growth temperatures and/or higher growth rates will minimize autodoping, interface variations, and the resulting degradation of device performance. Higher growth rates and lower temperature processing can be achieved using higher-order silane source gases, such as disilane Si2H6 . Fig. 1 shows a horizontal, inductively heated, air-cooled, CVD quartz reactor 8 which is conventionally used for the deposition of epitaxial and polycrystalline silicon from monosilane (SiH4) in a hydrogen carrier gas. Typically, SiH4 diluted to 0.01-0.1 vol% in H2 is passed over the Si substrates 10 located on susceptor 12 at total flows f=1-10 P/min and pressure p=1 atm. An RF coil 14 surrounds quartz tube
8. Systems operated at low pressure (< 1 torr), with or without various carrier gases can be employed. In Fig. 2, results obtained in Si depositions under identical conditions are plotted vs. reciprocal temperature for the new source gas disilane, Si2H6, and for the conventionally used silane, SiH4 . The concentration of the silicon source in hydrogen was 0.026 vol.%. In the temperature regime where the deposition rate becomes diffusion controlled (T > 850OEC), a rate enhancement of nearly a factor of three is achieved with Si2H6 . The decline in rate which occurs for Si2H6 when T > 900OEC implies that some Si2H6 is being lost to gas phase nucleation and/or wall deposition (ahead of the substrates), because of its lower thermal stability. Thus, even higher deposition rates may be achieved with Si2H6 compared to SiH4 under more optimal conditions (such as lower Si2H6 partial press...