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Browse Prior Art Database

Low Pressure CVD Process for Micro and Polycrystalline Silicon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046538D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blum, JM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Micro and polycrystalline silicon thin films are prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) processes in which the source gas is disilane (Si2H6). The use of disilane has significant advantages over the use of silane (SiH). The deposition parameters are typically the following: pressure approximately 100 microns, substrate temperature 470-620ŒC, and flow rate Si2H6 of 32 sccm. Significantly enhanced growth rates are obtained, as indicated by the above plot of the growth rate versus temperature for the process using silane and disilane. This process reduces dopant surface migration to grain boundaries and dopant clumping during film deposition. In turn, this reduces the need for a high temperature dopant activation cycle in order to redistribute the dopant.

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Low Pressure CVD Process for Micro and Polycrystalline Silicon

Micro and polycrystalline silicon thin films are prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) processes in which the source gas is disilane (Si2H6). The use of disilane has significant advantages over the use of silane (SiH). The deposition parameters are typically the following: pressure approximately 100 microns, substrate temperature 470-620OEC, and flow rate Si2H6 of 32 sccm. Significantly enhanced growth rates are obtained, as indicated by the above plot of the growth rate versus temperature for the process using silane and disilane. This process reduces dopant surface migration to grain boundaries and dopant clumping during film deposition. In turn, this reduces the need for a high temperature dopant activation cycle in order to redistribute the dopant. Higher process throughputs are obtained due to greatly enhanced low temperature deposition rates, and there is enhanced hydrogen incorporation in the deposited film. As noted from the figure, the relative rate advantage of deposition from disilane rather than silane increases at lower temperatures, hinting at a lower activation energy for the disilane process. The implication of this is that it extends downwardly the range of temperature over which useful CVD growth rates may be obtained, thus allowing lower temperature device fabrication. Depending upon the temperature regime, either micro or polycrystalline silicon will be deposit...