Browse Prior Art Database

Multiple Terminal Simulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046549D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kelly, KF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Providing multiple terminal simulating capabilities permits a user on one terminal to easily switch between logons and perform the work of several terminals. Normally, a terminal is logged on to one address space at a time. By providing multiple terminal simulator code, a user invokes a simulator command under his normal logon. The simulator will then request that some number of job names, user names, and environment names be entered. This data is used to start multiple jobs. In a system that supports logons across different nodes connected via networking, the target node name for the jobs may be other than the node the user is currently running on. The started jobs or address spaces connect back to the simulator. The simulator saves the current screen image of each address space.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Multiple Terminal Simulator

Providing multiple terminal simulating capabilities permits a user on one terminal to easily switch between logons and perform the work of several terminals. Normally, a terminal is logged on to one address space at a time. By providing multiple terminal simulator code, a user invokes a simulator command under his normal logon. The simulator will then request that some number of job names, user names, and environment names be entered. This data is used to start multiple jobs. In a system that supports logons across different nodes connected via networking, the target node name for the jobs may be other than the node the user is currently running on. The started jobs or address spaces connect back to the simulator. The simulator saves the current screen image of each address space. The jobs behave as though they were logged onto from a terminal. The simulator presents the user with a screen that indicates whether each of the started jobs has any new output. By pressing a function key, the user can see the output of a specific job and enter input for it.

By pressing a function key the user can return to the simulator screen or move to the saved image of the next job. This usage of function keys does not preclude their use by the started job since the key reserved for return to the simulator screen may simply be pressed a second time to send the equivalent of pressing it once to the started job.

1