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Ink Spitter for Hot Melt Ink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046551D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hendriks, F: AUTHOR

Abstract

The printer device described herein is based on the premise that accelerations caused by longitudinal vibration of a piezoelectric crystal can overcome the surface tension that holds molten ink captive to the tip of a needle. The needle 10 within shroud 14 in Fig. 1 can be shaped to amplify the motion of the piezoelectric crystal 12. Instead of flowing through a nozzle, it is proposed that the ink flow through one or more V-shaped grooves, as shown in Fig. 2. To avoid excessive evaporation, a meltable ink with low vapor pressure is to be used. Drying on the paper is by solidification. The redundancy of ink supply paths should make the ink supply more reliable, although it will be necessary to shield the ink grooves from airborne contaminants. The needle 10 and piezoelectric crystal 12 of Fig.

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Ink Spitter for Hot Melt Ink

The printer device described herein is based on the premise that accelerations caused by longitudinal vibration of a piezoelectric crystal can overcome the surface tension that holds molten ink captive to the tip of a needle. The needle 10 within shroud 14 in Fig. 1 can be shaped to amplify the motion of the piezoelectric crystal 12. Instead of flowing through a nozzle, it is proposed that the ink flow through one or more V-shaped grooves, as shown in Fig. 2. To avoid excessive evaporation, a meltable ink with low vapor pressure is to be used. Drying on the paper is by solidification. The redundancy of ink supply paths should make the ink supply more reliable, although it will be necessary to shield the ink grooves from airborne contaminants. The needle 10 and piezoelectric crystal 12 of Fig. 1 are shown in more detail in Fig. 3. The described device overcomes the problems of slow drying of ink on paper, printer nozzle clogging of conventional drop-on-demand devices and the difficulty of finding inks that don't wet nozzle materials over long periods of time.

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