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Terminal ENABLE With Logon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046581D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kelly, KF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Logon routines are alleviated by allowing a system operator to enable terminals and force the first logon. Before a terminal can be used by a user, it must first be enabled. Enabling causes the system component that manages terminals to place a fill-in-the-blanks logo on a terminal. Normally the user fills in the user identification and password to cause a logon to an address space. As an option using a variation of the ENABLE command called ENABLEL, the user can cause a simulated entering of a user ID and environment name on one or more terminals. Thus no logo will appear. Displayed will be whatever the logged-onto application writes to the terminal. When the user logs off, a logo will appear.

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Terminal ENABLE With Logon

Logon routines are alleviated by allowing a system operator to enable terminals and force the first logon. Before a terminal can be used by a user, it must first be enabled. Enabling causes the system component that manages terminals to place a fill-in-the-blanks logo on a terminal. Normally the user fills in the user identification and password to cause a logon to an address space. As an option using a variation of the ENABLE command called ENABLEL, the user can cause a simulated entering of a user ID and environment name on one or more terminals. Thus no logo will appear. Displayed will be whatever the logged-onto application writes to the terminal. When the user logs off, a logo will appear. A plus is that by using ENABLEL to enable and logon the terminals, and by issuing a disable command after logon, no logo will ever appear. The terminal will simply die after logoff. Further, users of certain applications need only know which terminal to use, and never know about logon screens.

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