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Random Access of Cryogenic Chip Electrically and Optically

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046602D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Faris, SM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Room-temperature integrated-circuit (IC) chips and other systems are easily accessible for probing and testing because they are in a convenient environment where microscopes, micro-manipulators and x-y-z translating stages can be used.

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Random Access of Cryogenic Chip Electrically and Optically

Room-temperature integrated-circuit (IC) chips and other systems are easily accessible for probing and testing because they are in a convenient environment where microscopes, micro-manipulators and x-y-z translating stages can be used.

Integrated circuits which are designed to operate in a cryogenic environment, such as liquid helium, cannot take advantage of these well-developed room- temperature techniques. In order to make electrical connections to cryogenic samples, inflexible methods are used, such as fixed pattern sample holder, wire bending which may not cycle well, etc. It is, therefore, desirable to have a technique for making multiple electrical contacts in a nondestructive manner.

This article shows a technique for making multiple contacts to an IC chip in a cryogenic environment which can test devices and circuits located randomly therein. In addition to making electrical contacts, optical contacts (irradiation) are also made to randomly located devices on a chip. This function avoids the use of optical dewars which are specially made for optical experiments. Contacts to randomly located devices are made without the need for x-y-z translation stages which would have to work in the cryogenic environment.

Fig. 1 shows a perspective view of a jig 1 which permits both wire and optical contacts to be made to an integrated-circuit chip. Fig. 1 is disposed in a cryogenic environment. A chip 2 is inserted in an aperture 3 which is precisely machined in a brass or aluminum base 4. Four alignment p...