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Nesting of Ceramic Chip Capacitor for Thin Film Termination

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046628D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Humenik, JN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The fabrication of thick film ceramic chip decoupling capacitors for future, on-substrate use requires an accurate alignment of internal tabs followed by the application of a special thin film termination to one side. The handling and alignment difficulties associated with the small size of the capacitor (0.050 x 0.070 x 0.080 inch) necessitates fabrication of a "master slice" containing multiple units of capacitors and dicing the individual units after the processing is completed. However, tight dimensional tolerances, inability to electrically test individual units and the dicing of the sintered block present problems which are at the limits of the state of the art. A new method to ease these problems, called "nesting", is suggested.

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Nesting of Ceramic Chip Capacitor for Thin Film Termination

The fabrication of thick film ceramic chip decoupling capacitors for future, on- substrate use requires an accurate alignment of internal tabs followed by the application of a special thin film termination to one side. The handling and alignment difficulties associated with the small size of the capacitor (0.050 x
0.070 x 0.080 inch) necessitates fabrication of a "master slice" containing multiple units of capacitors and dicing the individual units after the processing is completed. However, tight dimensional tolerances, inability to electrically test individual units and the dicing of the sintered block present problems which are at the limits of the state of the art. A new method to ease these problems, called "nesting", is suggested. It allows sintering of individual capacitors whereby greatest dimensional control can be exercised. These capacitor units would then be assembled to form a "nest" analogous to a "master slice" for accurate application of the thin film termination. This concept therefore permits the flexibility to take advantage of both the individual handling when required and assembling in a block form when handling is a problem. Possible nest materials include metals such as stainless steel, plastics such as BAKELITE* or even potting materials which can be cast around the capacitor. These materials can be treated in an oxygen plasma, if needed, to facilitate photolithography. In additio...