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Photosensitive Glass for Producing Recessed Metallurgy, Eliminating Need for Planarization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046632D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shaw, RR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A photosensitive glass, after exposure to appropriate radiation (light, X-rays, electrons, etc.), can be crystallized by heat treatment into a desired pattern. Selective etching can then produce the pattern in three dimensions. Different exposure conditions (time/intensity/temperature) yield different etch structure depths. The application of this technique to formation of recess metallurgy is shown in Figs. 1 to 4. A photosensitive glass is coated on a substrate (Fig. 1), is selectively exposed and etched to produce, where required, multidepth recesses, as shown in Fig. 2. After deposition of a thin precoat of chromium, the unit is blanket coated with copper into the structure of Fig. 3. In the next step (Fig.

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Photosensitive Glass for Producing Recessed Metallurgy, Eliminating Need for Planarization

A photosensitive glass, after exposure to appropriate radiation (light, X-rays, electrons, etc.), can be crystallized by heat treatment into a desired pattern. Selective etching can then produce the pattern in three dimensions. Different exposure conditions (time/intensity/temperature) yield different etch structure depths. The application of this technique to formation of recess metallurgy is shown in Figs. 1 to 4. A photosensitive glass is coated on a substrate (Fig. 1), is selectively exposed and etched to produce, where required, multidepth recesses, as shown in Fig. 2. After deposition of a thin precoat of chromium, the unit is blanket coated with copper into the structure of Fig. 3. In the next step (Fig. 4), the copper layer can be buffed with the glass dielectric layer serving as a reference surface, where the camber and flatness of the underlying substrate are only of minimal importance.

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