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METHOD OF USING AN ELS MICROPROBE TO ANALYZE Pt/Si CONTACTS IN SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046643D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Demoncy, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

The various surface analysis techniques currently employed in many industrial environments call for the use of instruments such as electronic, photonic, ionic or particulate spectrometers (AES, EMP, SIMS, ESCA). In recent years, some theoretical work has been done in the field of one of these techniques, called Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (ELS). Until now, an ELS technique was used in either of two modes, namely, a transmission mode, requiring the application of a high primary voltage (> 50 keV), and a reflection mode, in which a low primary voltage (< 50 eV)= is used. However, the reflection mode only permits analyzing the surface of comparatively large areas, and not that of micro-areas (a few microns in diameter).

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METHOD OF USING AN ELS MICROPROBE TO ANALYZE Pt/Si CONTACTS IN SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES

The various surface analysis techniques currently employed in many industrial environments call for the use of instruments such as electronic, photonic, ionic or particulate spectrometers (AES, EMP, SIMS, ESCA). In recent years, some theoretical work has been done in the field of one of these techniques, called Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (ELS). Until now, an ELS technique was used in either of two modes, namely, a transmission mode, requiring the application of a high primary voltage (> 50 keV), and a reflection mode, in which a low primary voltage (< 50 eV)= is used. However, the reflection mode only permits analyzing the surface of comparatively large areas, and not that of micro- areas (a few microns in diameter). While a micro-area can be analyzed in the transmission mode, most of the information thus obtained relates to the body of the element being analyzed rather than to its surface. The present method provides a practical means of analyzing the surface of micro-areas, such as the contacts of a transistor, by applying intermediate accelerating voltages (in the range of 100 to 1000 eV) to an ELS microprobe, thereby enabling the primary electron beam to be adequately focused. The ELS microprobe can be used in accordance with the present method to analyze, inter alia, the metallurgy of the contacts of a semiconductor transistor. In a conventional device, the contacts a...