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Browse Prior Art Database

3-D Television

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046646D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callens, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

This method enables three-dimensional (3-D) television that could use presently available facilities. The basic principle used leads to obtaining sequentially alternating pictures which are alternatively visible to one eye only. For instance, odd images are to be of one color (C1) and even images to be of another color (C2), and the viewer should wear glasses passing only the C1 color for to eye and the C2 color to the other. At the transmitting side of the network, two black and white vidicons are used. These vidicons provide time-varying video signals corresponding to the C1 and C2 sequences of images, respectively. These signals, before being transmitted, are then processed to generate a video signal, which, on a conventional color TV set, would generate C1 and C2 colored images, respectively.

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3-D Television

This method enables three-dimensional (3-D) television that could use presently available facilities. The basic principle used leads to obtaining sequentially alternating pictures which are alternatively visible to one eye only. For instance, odd images are to be of one color (C1) and even images to be of another color (C2), and the viewer should wear glasses passing only the C1 color for to eye and the C2 color to the other. At the transmitting side of the network, two black and white vidicons are used. These vidicons provide time-varying video signals corresponding to the C1 and C2 sequences of images, respectively. These signals, before being transmitted, are then processed to generate a video signal, which, on a conventional color TV set, would generate C1 and C2 colored images, respectively. For instance, C1 would combine blue and yellow, while C2 would combine red and turquoise. The process could be extended to 3-D color TV combining three carefully selected colors for coding the signals C1 and C2 which originally each carried the three basic colors used for color TV, i.e., red, green and blue.

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