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In-Situ Depth Analysis for Dynamic Auger Analysis

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046653D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kaus, G: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The sensitivity of Auger signals to changes in the sample position relative to the Auger analyzer is used to measure the position of the receding sample surface during depth profiling. Auger analyzers, such as the known cyclindrical mirror analyzer, require the sample to be accurately positioned, in order to obtain optimum Auger signals. Thus, prior to each Auger analysis, the sample is adjusted to the energy position of the so-called elastic peak at 2000 eV (position I of the marker in the figure showing a plot of the first derivative of a peak signal). If the sample surface is subsequently subjected to an eroding ion beam, an etch depth W d produces an energy shift W E and an output voltage signal W y (position II of the marker). As a displacement W d = 0.

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In-Situ Depth Analysis for Dynamic Auger Analysis

The sensitivity of Auger signals to changes in the sample position relative to the Auger analyzer is used to measure the position of the receding sample surface during depth profiling. Auger analyzers, such as the known cyclindrical mirror analyzer, require the sample to be accurately positioned, in order to obtain optimum Auger signals. Thus, prior to each Auger analysis, the sample is adjusted to the energy position of the so-called elastic peak at 2000 eV (position I of the marker in the figure showing a plot of the first derivative of a peak signal).

If the sample surface is subsequently subjected to an eroding ion beam, an etch depth W d produces an energy shift W E and an output voltage signal W y (position II of the marker). As a displacement W d = 0.05 mm leads to an energy shift of about 1 eV, sensitive voltage measurements in the mV range permit determining depths down to 10 nm. To maintain the optimum position of the sample surface even during crater formation, the output signal W y can also be used to appropriately control a piezoelectric element on which the sample is mounted. Thus, sputter rates or etch depths can be rapidly measured with great precision and at little cost. The above-described method is particularly suitable for depth profiling multilayer structures.

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