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Convertible Direct and Reflected Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046658D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoffman, HS: AUTHOR

Abstract

People with bifocal glasses feel comfortable when reading if they can look down at a desk top to read. However, reading a vertical display screen with bifocal glasses produces discomfort in that it requires tipping the head back. A system for reading a display screen which eliminates this problem is constructed and operates as follows. A mirror is positioned parallel to the desk top to reflect the electronically produced mirror image on a display panel to the eye, the image corresponding to papers on the desk. If the rays from the panel center to the mirror are perpendicular to the panel surface, there will be no apparent foreshortening effect. If the mirror is further positioned slightly above the desk top, there will be room for an associated keyboard positioned at least partially under the mirror.

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Convertible Direct and Reflected Display

People with bifocal glasses feel comfortable when reading if they can look down at a desk top to read. However, reading a vertical display screen with bifocal glasses produces discomfort in that it requires tipping the head back. A system for reading a display screen which eliminates this problem is constructed and operates as follows. A mirror is positioned parallel to the desk top to reflect the electronically produced mirror image on a display panel to the eye, the image corresponding to papers on the desk. If the rays from the panel center to the mirror are perpendicular to the panel surface, there will be no apparent foreshortening effect. If the mirror is further positioned slightly above the desk top, there will be room for an associated keyboard positioned at least partially under the mirror. Alternatively, the display panel can be tilted vertically and the mirror folded behind the panel for normal viewing by someone without glasses. The above-described mirror approach creates a hood effect to reduce the contrast and glare problems caused by room lighting. Flexible curtains attached to the links and mirror can complete the hood. The length of the mirror would be somewhat longer than the height of the panel depending on the tilting angle. The width of the mirror can be less than panel width because the light rays from the panel converge toward the eye and thereby occupy less width at the mirror location. A linkage a...