Browse Prior Art Database

Fault-Activated Reset

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046702D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Herald, RF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a flexible diskette drive using a microprocessor for drive control functions, illegal conditions can be detected and compensated for or signaled to the user. During the product development phase of such products the problem can be noticed and corrected instead of overlooked until a serious field problem is caused by a particular user operation. An added benefit is that the fault condition of a malfunctioning file adapter will be signaled in the field even though the original design was good. The signal is conveyed via the reset action. This may for example consist of starting the program over and doing a reorientation of the read/write read to track 0/.

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Fault-Activated Reset

In a flexible diskette drive using a microprocessor for drive control functions, illegal conditions can be detected and compensated for or signaled to the user. During the product development phase of such products the problem can be noticed and corrected instead of overlooked until a serious field problem is caused by a particular user operation. An added benefit is that the fault condition of a malfunctioning file adapter will be signaled in the field even though the original design was good. The signal is conveyed via the reset action. This may for example consist of starting the program over and doing a reorientation of the read/write read to track 0/. Typical error conditions which would cause a reset or a fault signal are: Illegal access; Write gate going on or being on during an access;

Loss of low frequency transmitted clock;

Change of the direction line during a single

uninterrupted access;

and Spindle motor control failure, such as

total loss of tachometer frequency.

too long a tachometer period, or

repeated operation at motor control limits.

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