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Flux Rationing Transforming Winding to Effect Fractional Turns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046752D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Christensen, JJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This transformer winding technique includes an auxiliary winding to ration the flux in each of the outside core legs so that fractional turn voltages are provided without uneven loading of the transformer core. Fig. 1 illustrates a winding to provide a half turn. Auxiliary winding 1 is wound around each of the outside core legs and connected in parallel. It forces the flux and, therefore, the volts per turn around each window to be equal. Fig. 2 shows this imbalance correction effected by using two windings of equal turns terminating out of different windows and connected in parallel. This effectively provides a winding of one and one-half turns. Other fractional turns ratios are possible using the auxiliary winding to set the ratio of volts per turn around each of the core windows. Fig.

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Flux Rationing Transforming Winding to Effect Fractional Turns

This transformer winding technique includes an auxiliary winding to ration the flux in each of the outside core legs so that fractional turn voltages are provided without uneven loading of the transformer core. Fig. 1 illustrates a winding to provide a half turn. Auxiliary winding 1 is wound around each of the outside core legs and connected in parallel. It forces the flux and, therefore, the volts per turn around each window to be equal. Fig. 2 shows this imbalance correction effected by using two windings of equal turns terminating out of different windows and connected in parallel. This effectively provides a winding of one and one-half turns. Other fractional turns ratios are possible using the auxiliary winding to set the ratio of volts per turn around each of the core windows. Fig. 3 shows a transformer which has, by virtue of auxiliary winding 2, twice the volts per turn around one window as around the other. Therefore, the user of this transformer has a choice of using full, one-third, two-thirds, or any combination of these fractions to get windows of N/3 turns, where N is an integer. When using unbalanced (as in one-third turns) transformers, the core must be sized to allow for the higher peak flux density in the higher volts per turn leg. For example, the transformer with one-third turns would have one-third higher flux density in one outside leg as the average flux density throughout the c...