Browse Prior Art Database

Structured Graphic Set Translation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046782D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barnes, JG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The present technique enables small computer systems to support multiple keyboards and print documents generated by this multiplicity of keyboards to satisfy the varying graphic and symbol requirements of each country. Each of the characters and/or graphics included on a print element exist at a particular physical location on the element. For a wide range of characters, the locations are the same on a wide variety of print elements. For example, a lower case "a" will exist at the same location on many of the print elements available for a particular printer. A change in keyboard coding presents no problem for this character as long as the character exists at the expected physical location on the print element being used.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Structured Graphic Set Translation

The present technique enables small computer systems to support multiple keyboards and print documents generated by this multiplicity of keyboards to satisfy the varying graphic and symbol requirements of each country. Each of the characters and/or graphics included on a print element exist at a particular physical location on the element.

For a wide range of characters, the locations are the same on a wide variety of print elements. For example, a lower case "a" will exist at the same location on many of the print elements available for a particular printer. A change in keyboard coding presents no problem for this character as long as the character exists at the expected physical location on the print element being used. However, certain characters exist at different physical locations on different print elements available to a particular printer. If the encoding keyboard does not match the print element being used, a different character than that keyed will be printed, although the keyed character might be available on the print element. With the present technique there is a recoding of keyed characters to cause the intended character to be printed from the print element being used. There are instances in which a composite character, for example, an overstruck "a" to produce the symbol "â", is called for by the keyboard coding. This composite character is not available as a single character on a wide range of print elements, but both the overstrike "OE" and lower case "a" characters are widely available on many print elements. If both are available on the print element in use, the character can be constructed according to this technique. The Structured Graphic Set Translation (SGST), which consists of an algorithm and table structure, provides an efficient means for small computer systems to support multiple keyboards. The SGST technique consolidates all unique graphics that are supported by the system into a system graphic set. The system graphic set assigns a number (referred to as a reorder number) to each unique graphic. Assume the reorder number range is from 0 to "Z", where Z is a number equal to or greater than the number of unique graphics supported by the system. The numbers are...