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Dual Keyboard to Support Native Languages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046788D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chukran, RE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Historically, data processing machines have been programmed in English and, in fact, such popular programming languages as BASIC, FORTRAN, and PASCAL are defined only in English. In addition, some characters which are used in the definition of these languages are not available on the normal word processor keyboards. Therefore, a programmer who wants to write an application program using a word processor in a data processing mode must use a keyboard which supports the characters used in the definition of the programming language employed. On the other hand, the operator who runs the application program will want to use a keyboard which supports his native language characters for the input of data.

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Dual Keyboard to Support Native Languages

Historically, data processing machines have been programmed in English and, in fact, such popular programming languages as BASIC, FORTRAN, and PASCAL are defined only in English. In addition, some characters which are used in the definition of these languages are not available on the normal word processor keyboards. Therefore, a programmer who wants to write an application program using a word processor in a data processing mode must use a keyboard which supports the characters used in the definition of the programming language employed. On the other hand, the operator who runs the application program will want to use a keyboard which supports his native language characters for the input of data. A dual-keyboard approach is used to help the programmer to provide the native keyboard to the operator as well as allowing native language words to be displayed on the screen and printed by the printer. The programmer sets up two keyboards through a profile utility, and then these two keyboards can be selected via a toggle switch on the physical keyboard. When the toggle selects the programming keyboard, the whole screen shows that the keyboard and the matching printwheel can be used to print the characters corresponding to the programming keyboard. The programmer keys his application program statements using the Screen Editor and the programming keyboard. When the programmer comes to a place in his program where he wants to send...