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Improved Design of an Electrical Component Test System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046807D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Alewine, NJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This arrangement provides an increased dynamic response of a temperature/humidity/pressure/bias test system used for component life testing, while reducing the cost of said system. The figure shows an improved test system where the air temperature alone is controlled, thus eliminating the thermal masses of both pressure vessels. Vessel 1 is held at a constant temperature higher than needed (i.e., 200ŒC). As saturated air leaves vessel 1, it is cooled to the desired temperature T1. This causes excess water to condense out of the air and drain at the steam trap. The air is then heated to temperature T2 and passed into vessel 2. Vessel 2 consists of a thin-wall vessel 10 containing the components under test. This is surrounded by insulation which is encased in the heavy pressure vessel 12.

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Improved Design of an Electrical Component Test System

This arrangement provides an increased dynamic response of a temperature/humidity/pressure/bias test system used for component life testing, while reducing the cost of said system. The figure shows an improved test system where the air temperature alone is controlled, thus eliminating the thermal masses of both pressure vessels. Vessel 1 is held at a constant temperature higher than needed (i.e., 200OEC). As saturated air leaves vessel 1, it is cooled to the desired temperature T1. This causes excess water to condense out of the air and drain at the steam trap. The air is then heated to temperature T2 and passed into vessel 2. Vessel 2 consists of a thin-wall vessel 10 containing the components under test. This is surrounded by insulation which is encased in the heavy pressure vessel 12. The insulation is sealed from humid air contained in the thin-wall vessel, and is kept at an equal pressure with it by injecting dry air tapped from a common pressure regulator 14. The humid air leaves vessel 2 by way of a control valve 16. The air in vessel 2 is kept at the set value T2 by recirculating it through the cooler 18, bringing it back to T1, and then heating it, returning it to T2. Since vessel 1 does not change temperature (it could be changed so that pressure can be reduced while still producing saturated conditions, but would not require accurate control) and pressure vessel 2 is insulated from temperature chan...