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Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Cable Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046808D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

App, RH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Cable testing by hand is a tedious, time consuming and often inaccurate way of testing cabling. An automatic cable tester would speed up testing and eliminate human inaccuracy in testing cables. The fixture consists of a micro-controller 1 (for example, Intel 8085), display terminal 2, printer 3, and a test fixture 4 with appropriate connectors. The concept is to have a "golden cable" 5 (known good) that is tested first and data mapped into memory, the data being a string of 0's and 1's, zero being an open circuit or no wire present and a one being a short circuit or a wire present in the cable. The cable under test is then tested and also mapped into memory. The two sets of cable data (0's and 1's) bit patterns should match for the cable to pass.

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Automatic Cable Tester

Cable testing by hand is a tedious, time consuming and often inaccurate way of testing cabling. An automatic cable tester would speed up testing and eliminate human inaccuracy in testing cables. The fixture consists of a micro-controller 1 (for example, Intel 8085), display terminal 2, printer 3, and a test fixture 4 with appropriate connectors. The concept is to have a "golden cable" 5 (known good) that is tested first and data mapped into memory, the data being a string of 0's and 1's, zero being an open circuit or no wire present and a one being a short circuit or a wire present in the cable. The cable under test is then tested and also mapped into memory. The two sets of cable data (0's and 1's) bit patterns should match for the cable to pass. Where the bits differ, this indicates a failure on one or more of the pins in the cable and is so printed out on hard copy for use in repairing the cable. Suppose that a cable under test had 12 wires in it and had a connector at each end. Each connector has 15 pin holes for a total of 15 possible wires. If two wires in the cable were inadvertently switched, the cable tester would be able to detect the difference. The bit patterns would look like the following example: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Wire Number 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 Gold Cable 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 Test Cable V V Failure The following errors would appear on the Terminal and Printer: *ERROR - OPEN CIRCUIT - INPU...