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Computer-Controlled Access to Laser for Maintenance

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046874D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Enright, CJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A computer that is used by personnel who service a laser also monitors the electric interlock switches that are opened or closed when safety devices on the laser are disabled. Each person who maintains the laser is given an identification code and is given authorization to perform certain maintenance routines and to disable the corresponding laser safety devices. This information is stored in the computer. At the beginning of a maintenance operation, the service person enters his or her identification code. The computer assists in the maintenance operations and permits the safety devices to be disabled only at the levels for which the person has been authorized. A laser, like some other apparatus, has interlocks that are intended to prevent unauthorized personnel from disabling safety devices.

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Computer-Controlled Access to Laser for Maintenance

A computer that is used by personnel who service a laser also monitors the electric interlock switches that are opened or closed when safety devices on the laser are disabled. Each person who maintains the laser is given an identification code and is given authorization to perform certain maintenance routines and to disable the corresponding laser safety devices. This information is stored in the computer. At the beginning of a maintenance operation, the service person enters his or her identification code. The computer assists in the maintenance operations and permits the safety devices to be disabled only at the levels for which the person has been authorized. A laser, like some other apparatus, has interlocks that are intended to prevent unauthorized personnel from disabling safety devices. Safety devices are disabled for maintenance, but there is ordinarily a hierarchy of maintenance levels, and personnel are trained to perform maintenance and to understand the safety requirements at different levels. The safety interlocks sometimes include switches that are opened or closed when the safety device is disabled, and some systems use logic circuits to monitor the interlocks.

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