Browse Prior Art Database

Word Processor General Interface Routines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046958D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Souter, JG: AUTHOR

Abstract

In order to provide more flexibility and increase the number of applications which can be run on a word processor, such as the IBM Displaywriter, it is necessary to adopt a standard operating system, such as the University of California San Diego p-System. The UCSD p-System expects all code to be addressable within a 64K code segment in the memory. One memory arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 with the UCSD p-System physically located adjacent the Basic Input Output System (BIOS) within the 64K code segment. However, in developing the BIOS code, it would be advantageous to use extra space in memory for the BIOS in order that the p-System could have more room to operate and thus acquire efficiency gains. The solution as shown in Fig.

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Word Processor General Interface Routines

In order to provide more flexibility and increase the number of applications which can be run on a word processor, such as the IBM Displaywriter, it is necessary to adopt a standard operating system, such as the University of California San Diego p-System. The UCSD p-System expects all code to be addressable within a 64K code segment in the memory. One memory arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 with the UCSD p-System physically located adjacent the Basic Input Output System (BIOS) within the 64K code segment. However, in developing the BIOS code, it would be advantageous to use extra space in memory for the BIOS in order that the p-System could have more room to operate and thus acquire efficiency gains. The solution as shown in Fig. 2 is to locate the BIOS at the top of the memory address space and develop a small core of code, called general interface routines, that occupies minimal space in the p-System's 64K code segment. The function of the general interface routines is to perform the necessary program linkage and communications between the p- System and the BIOS such that, operationally, they appear to be in the same 64K segment. This allows locating the BIOS at the top of the available memory and provides more space for the p-System in which to operate. As a specific example, the size of the BIOS might be 16,895 bytes and the size of the general interface routines might be 1050 bytes. The difference (15,845 bytes) is th...