Browse Prior Art Database

Packaging for Use in Automated Assembling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046992D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Campbell, CA: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Described are several features used in the packaging of parts that are to be extracted by automated assembly systems. The specific problems addressed are shock absorption, tabs for automated removal of interleaved tray separators and accurate location, and symmetrical arrangement. The parts described are packed in cartons using one or more layers of thermoformed trays. Parts packed in cartons are subject to occasional rough handling. The design features of the thermoformed trays are directed to providing protection for the parts against damage from dropping, and so on. Each tray is designed with a shock-absorbing feature for part protection when dropped from heights up to 30 inches. Several shock-absorbing configurations can be used, each being designed so that it may collapse if dropped by absorbing some of the impact shock.

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Packaging for Use in Automated Assembling

Described are several features used in the packaging of parts that are to be extracted by automated assembly systems. The specific problems addressed are shock absorption, tabs for automated removal of interleaved tray separators and accurate location, and symmetrical arrangement. The parts described are packed in cartons using one or more layers of thermoformed trays. Parts packed in cartons are subject to occasional rough handling. The design features of the thermoformed trays are directed to providing protection for the parts against damage from dropping, and so on. Each tray is designed with a shock-absorbing feature for part protection when dropped from heights up to 30 inches. Several shock-absorbing configurations can be used, each being designed so that it may collapse if dropped by absorbing some of the impact shock. Fig. 1 illustrates two different exemplary configurations. Each tray cavity is also designed so that the tray, when loaded with parts, may be roughly handled without dislodging the parts. Cavity depths are designed to prevent dislodging when the containers are being indexed into and out of the robot's part-extraction zone. This feature helps to assure that parts will remain on location and in the correct position. For parts to be extracted from thermoformed trays by automated means, the tray location within the container must be accurately maintained. Typically, part location accuracy must be maintained to within .50 inch. The tray and carton design enables the part location to be maintained to within 0.125 inch RMS which permits part-location accuracy that enhances the automatic extraction process. Trays are also designed to maintain accuracy in the vertical direction, as shown in Fig. 2, in containers having more than one layer. This feature maintains the height from layer to layer so that the part's feature presented to the robot for grasping is adequate to extract the part. Extracting parts from thermoformed trays by automated means creates a need also to remove the tray when there are two or more layers. Thermoformed trays are designed so that they can be automatically removed from their containers. The "tab"...