Browse Prior Art Database

Simplified Calendar Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047012D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arter, NK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Most solid-state LCD (liquid crystal device) date displays use three pairs of seven-segment numbers showing the month, the day, and the year. This article describes an economical and easy-to-implement circuit for displaying a calendar conventionally as an entire month. A digital LCD display of a conventional calendar would require 1100 LCD drivers for a 31-day month, using 5 x 7 dot matrix technology. Using the arrangement depicted in Fig. 1, only 13 column drivers and seven row drivers are required. Only one of the row drivers and seven of the column drivers are turned on for a particular month. The row selector drivers display the days of the week for the selected month and the column drivers display the dates, properly arranged according to the days of the week. The dates 29, 30, and 31 are individually controlled.

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Simplified Calendar Display

Most solid-state LCD (liquid crystal device) date displays use three pairs of seven-segment numbers showing the month, the day, and the year. This article describes an economical and easy-to-implement circuit for displaying a calendar conventionally as an entire month. A digital LCD display of a conventional calendar would require 1100 LCD drivers for a 31-day month, using 5 x 7 dot matrix technology. Using the arrangement depicted in Fig. 1, only 13 column drivers and seven row drivers are required. Only one of the row drivers and seven of the column drivers are turned on for a particular month. The row selector drivers display the days of the week for the selected month and the column drivers display the dates, properly arranged according to the days of the week. The dates 29, 30, and 31 are individually controlled. An optional box or underline cursor can be used to highlight the present date. Facilities for selecting any desired month can be provided. The driver circuits themselves are well known in the art as are the date-keeping logic counters. Fig. 2 shows April, 1982 as displayed by activating row driver 4, column drivers 4-10, and dates 29 and
30.

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