Browse Prior Art Database

Compressed Character String

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047013D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bauer, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is the use of one or two characters to identify an array to be supplied by a program to cause artwork to be produced on a character-addressable printer, e.g., the IBM Model 6670 Information Distributor. It is sometimes desirable to print logotypes, signatures, or artwork sections on a character-addressable, scanning printer. The artwork will usually cover several contiguous character blocks, i.e., the area occupied by a character, and is supplied to the machine in the form of font memory. That is, each portion of the artwork corresponding to an area of a character block on the output sheet is stored as if it were a character in font memory.

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Compressed Character String

Described is the use of one or two characters to identify an array to be supplied by a program to cause artwork to be produced on a character-addressable printer, e.g., the IBM Model 6670 Information Distributor. It is sometimes desirable to print logotypes, signatures, or artwork sections on a character- addressable, scanning printer. The artwork will usually cover several contiguous character blocks, i.e., the area occupied by a character, and is supplied to the machine in the form of font memory. That is, each portion of the artwork corresponding to an area of a character block on the output sheet is stored as if it were a character in font memory. To produce the artwork, a string of characters is supplied to the machine to the address that corresponds to the "font" memory locations that make up contiguous sections of the artwork. In the usual implementation, the character string to produce the artwork is typed in by the operator, but this is laborious and time consuming. Furthermore, any error is immediately apparent in the resulting printout. As a result, there is a disinclination to use the full capacity of a machine. By providing the character string as a pre-prepared sequence in memory, the input by the operator of one or two identifying characters causes the entire character string to be reproduced as if it were typed by the operator, thereby saving the time and trouble of manually entering the string. As an example of the use of one character representing a character string, a logotype, e.g., IBM, is used as illustrated in Fig. 1. The A0 through AB blocks are the code points for the logo, i.e., the character block occupied by a portion of the logo. The text stream must be sent to the printer, e.g., as in Fig. 2. An operator must key in the text stream each time the logo is to be printed. If the text stream could be compressed into one code point, however, then the oper...