Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard Cursor Control Layout

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047038D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Williams, JA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Control of the position of a moving cursor on a CRT display has traditionally been via either a layout called the block cursor control, as shown in Fig. 3, or the cursor control cross, as shown in Fig. 4. This disclosure shows an alternative layout in which diagonal movement can be added. In Fig. 1, keys 1, 2, 3 and 4 are shown in top view. The arrows within the small circles shown on the keytops indicate the direction of motion that the cursor will take. If key 1 alone is depressed, a diagonal upward to the left cursor motion by one space will occur. If the top two keys 1 and 2 are pressed together, a vertical up motion will result. If the leftmost keys 1 and 4 are depressed simultaneously, a leftward motion will result and the remaining motions can be easily deduced from the arrows and the concept described.

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Keyboard Cursor Control Layout

Control of the position of a moving cursor on a CRT display has traditionally been via either a layout called the block cursor control, as shown in Fig. 3, or the cursor control cross, as shown in Fig. 4. This disclosure shows an alternative layout in which diagonal movement can be added. In Fig. 1, keys 1, 2, 3 and 4 are shown in top view. The arrows within the small circles shown on the keytops indicate the direction of motion that the cursor will take. If key 1 alone is depressed, a diagonal upward to the left cursor motion by one space will occur. If the top two keys 1 and 2 are pressed together, a vertical up motion will result. If the leftmost keys 1 and 4 are depressed simultaneously, a leftward motion will result and the remaining motions can be easily deduced from the arrows and the concept described. The two keys on the side of the square of the buttons 1, 2, 3 and 4, as shown in Fig. 1, need to be depressed to move in the direction of that side. Only a single key is required to move in a diagonal direction. If all four keys are depressed, a home return signal can be generated that returns the cursor to its rest position on the display. Fig. 2 shows a side elevation of the array in Fig. 1 in which keybuttons are shown to have a rounded profile with dimples or indentations 5, as shown. These aid in locating the finger positions so that an operator need not look away from the display in order to choose the appropriate button...