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Method for Replacing Electrical Lead Pins

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047043D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Froot, HA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This is a method for replacing electrical lead pins in a ceramic module which requires little or no heat. The method is comprised of several steps which are described with reference to the figure. A multilayer ceramic module 1 has a pin 2 which is soldered to the ceramic with solder 3 and is electrically connected to an internal conductor through a wettable metal pad and a via. A damaged pin may be replaced by first snipping the pin, leaving a cut shank 4. A replacement pin 5, comprising a collar 6 and a shank 7, is then placed over the cut shank 4. The replacement pin 5 may be one piece, or it may be two pieces which are fastened together. The replacement pin 5 is then fastened to the cut shank 4 at room temperature using a conducting epoxy or at slightly higher temperatures with a low melting temperature solder.

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Method for Replacing Electrical Lead Pins

This is a method for replacing electrical lead pins in a ceramic module which requires little or no heat. The method is comprised of several steps which are described with reference to the figure. A multilayer ceramic module 1 has a pin 2 which is soldered to the ceramic with solder 3 and is electrically connected to an internal conductor through a wettable metal pad and a via. A damaged pin may be replaced by first snipping the pin, leaving a cut shank 4.

A replacement pin 5, comprising a collar 6 and a shank 7, is then placed over the cut shank 4. The replacement pin 5 may be one piece, or it may be two pieces which are fastened together. The replacement pin 5 is then fastened to the cut shank 4 at room temperature using a conducting epoxy or at slightly higher temperatures with a low melting temperature solder.

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