Browse Prior Art Database

Screening Mask Cleaner With Reduced Vapor Emission

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047047D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crisafi, F: AUTHOR

Abstract

Environmental standards limit the amount of vapor emissions from cleaning agents, e.g., perchloroethylene (PCE). Presently, PCE is used to clean metal masks for screening metallic patterns on ceramic sheets. After screening, the metal mask is cleaned by spraying a powerful jet of solvent on the mask while stationed within a chamber. Both the mask and the chamber interior walls are "wetted" with the solution during the cleaning process. The mask and chamber are dried by a gas which is pumped into the chamber and exhausted to the atmosphere. This article proposes to reduce the amount of vapor emission in a cleaning process by (1) drying only the mask and (2) performing the drying in a different chamber which is not "wetted". In Fig.

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Screening Mask Cleaner With Reduced Vapor Emission

Environmental standards limit the amount of vapor emissions from cleaning agents, e.g., perchloroethylene (PCE). Presently, PCE is used to clean metal masks for screening metallic patterns on ceramic sheets. After screening, the metal mask is cleaned by spraying a powerful jet of solvent on the mask while stationed within a chamber. Both the mask and the chamber interior walls are "wetted" with the solution during the cleaning process. The mask and chamber are dried by a gas which is pumped into the chamber and exhausted to the atmosphere. This article proposes to reduce the amount of vapor emission in a cleaning process by (1) drying only the mask and (2) performing the drying in a different chamber which is not "wetted". In Fig. 1, chamber 10 serves as a buffer station for receiving and distributing masks to be cleaned and dried. The cleaning and drying take place in separate chambers 12 and 14, respectively. In one form, the mask may be transported among the chambers 10, 12 and 14 by hydraulically driven carriers, as shown, for example, in [1]. Movable doors 16 are operated during the chamber transfer and, when closed, seal the chambers from one another. In the chamber 12, a spray jet, as shown in Fig. 2, provides a powerful stream of solvent onto both sides of the mask. An example of a spray chamber is described in [1]. The drying chamber 14 includes air nozzles which direct jets of a gaseous medium, e.g., ni...