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Highly Non-Wettable Surface of Plasma Polymer Vapor Deposition of Tetrafluoroethylene

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047088D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Washo, BD: AUTHOR

Abstract

PPTFE (plasma polymer vapor deposition of tetrafluoroethylene) surfaces have been formed with a contact angle of 170Œ. This high contact angle is attributable to the fact that the surface has a micro-roughness as seen in a scanning electron microscope. (Micro-roughness is on the order of about 1. Roughness is defined as the ratio of valley periodic separation to valley depth, or in our case R Z 1m /1m = 1.) Background PPTFE is useful where a non-wettable surface is needed. It is conventional to indicate the wettability of a surface by the angle that a drop of water makes in contacting the surface. This angle is measured between the surface of the water drop that is in contact with the test surface and the adjacent water surface that is in contact with the air.

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Highly Non-Wettable Surface of Plasma Polymer Vapor Deposition of Tetrafluoroethylene

PPTFE (plasma polymer vapor deposition of tetrafluoroethylene) surfaces have been formed with a contact angle of 170OE. This high contact angle is attributable to the fact that the surface has a micro-roughness as seen in a scanning electron microscope. (Micro-roughness is on the order of about 1. Roughness is defined as the ratio of valley periodic separation to valley depth, or in our case R Z 1m /1m = 1.) Background PPTFE is useful where a non-wettable surface is needed. It is conventional to indicate the wettability of a surface by the angle that a drop of water makes in contacting the surface. This angle is measured between the surface of the water drop that is in contact with the test surface and the adjacent water surface that is in contact with the air. For example, water in a hemispherical shape would have a contact angle r of 90OE, and this angle is a common dividing line between wettable and nonwettable surfaces. The more wettable surfaces are characterized by r less than 90OE and the more non- wettable surfaces by r greater than 90OE. This property is in turn determined by the characteristic surface energy of the surface or substrate, and in general high surface energy surfaces are more wettable than low surface energy surfaces. The effect of roughness on surfaces is to make a wettable surface more wettable and to make a nonwettable surface more non-wettable. Implementation In the technique of fast polymerization under RF plasma conditions a powder (made in the vapor phase) i...