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Securing Printed Circuit Cables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047122D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Garrett, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Flexicables are custom-shaped printed circuits on a flexible plastics base. They are preformed to fit within electronic assemblies, but often need securing to the chassis at intermediate points along their length. This is typically achieved by pressing or otherwise forming metal lugs in the chassis which embrace opposite sides of the flexicable. A cheaper alternative technique is illustrated in the figures. The plastics base 10 of the cable (Fig. 1) is provided with pairs of eyelets 11 at suitable points along the cable. The chassis or other convenient panel 12 (Fig. 2) is provided with correspondingly located pairs of holes 13, and a respective bifurcated plastics peg 14 is inserted into each hole 13. The eyelets 11 are then pushed over the enlarged heads 15 of the pegs.

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Securing Printed Circuit Cables

Flexicables are custom-shaped printed circuits on a flexible plastics base. They are preformed to fit within electronic assemblies, but often need securing to the chassis at intermediate points along their length. This is typically achieved by pressing or otherwise forming metal lugs in the chassis which embrace opposite sides of the flexicable. A cheaper alternative technique is illustrated in the figures. The plastics base 10 of the cable (Fig. 1) is provided with pairs of eyelets 11 at suitable points along the cable. The chassis or other convenient panel 12 (Fig. 2) is provided with correspondingly located pairs of holes 13, and a respective bifurcated plastics peg 14 is inserted into each hole 13. The eyelets 11 are then pushed over the enlarged heads 15 of the pegs. The eyelets 11 are slightly smaller than the heads 15 so that the cable is retained on the pegs. Cables are thus quickly and cheaply secured in position, and may as quickly be removed for replacement simply by pulling the eyelets 11 off the heads 15, the pegs being retained in the panel by their bifurcated ends.

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