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Pitch Motion and Gripper for IBM 7535 Robot

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047143D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chu, KL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a pitch motion technique for the IBM 7535 robot which expands its use in many applications. The concept, as illustrated in Fig. 1, consists of an aluminum yoke assembly 1 which is attached to the existing "Z" motion shaft 2 by utilizing the existing gripper mounting plate 3. Mounted within the yoke assembly 1 is a pneumatic rotary actuator 4 with a double end shaft. The double end shaft of the rotary actuator contains a hole through its center that permits pressurized air to enter the selected side of the actuator, causing it to rotate in the desired direction. To convey the pressurized air, a swivel fitting 5 is affixed to each end of the actuator shaft around the exterior of the yoke assembly.

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Pitch Motion and Gripper for IBM 7535 Robot

This article describes a pitch motion technique for the IBM 7535 robot which expands its use in many applications. The concept, as illustrated in Fig. 1, consists of an aluminum yoke assembly 1 which is attached to the existing "Z" motion shaft 2 by utilizing the existing gripper mounting plate 3. Mounted within the yoke assembly 1 is a pneumatic rotary actuator 4 with a double end shaft. The double end shaft of the rotary actuator contains a hole through its center that permits pressurized air to enter the selected side of the actuator, causing it to rotate in the desired direction. To convey the pressurized air, a swivel fitting 5 is affixed to each end of the actuator shaft around the exterior of the yoke assembly. Attached to the swivel fitting 5 are air hoses 6 of appropriate size to convey the air and contain the pressure. Since the intent is to provide a low cost pitch motion, a stop pin 7 is inserted in the appropriate hole 8, spaced at 45OE intervals, for the desired pitch. The direction of rotation is controlled by a two- way solenoid controlled air valve or equivalent. Should variable positioning be desired or required, then the rotation can be controlled by a servo-control valve and a potentiometer for a closed-loop operation. A specially designed gripper is attached to the surface 9 of the rotary actuator, as shown in Fig. 2. Two microswitches 10 and 12 have been added to this unit. Switch 10 is attached to the gripper finger. Whe...