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Position-Retaining System for Forms Feed Stepper Motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047145D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bare, G: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In printing apparatus using a stepper motor to control forms line feed, it is desirable to conserve power when the motor is not transmitting motion. Traditionally, this has been accomplished by removing power from the motor actuation windings during idle periods of form positioning. However, this requires sufficient friction in the forms feed path (exerted by feed rollers, platen, etc.) to ensure that the form will not move when the motor excitation is disconnected. The other alternative is to retain power on the motor continuously, which tends to be wasteful of power. The alternative scheme presented herein is to apply low duty cycle pulse excitation to the stepper motor for actively holding it stationary. The low duty cycle reduces power consumption.

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Position-Retaining System for Forms Feed Stepper Motor

In printing apparatus using a stepper motor to control forms line feed, it is desirable to conserve power when the motor is not transmitting motion. Traditionally, this has been accomplished by removing power from the motor actuation windings during idle periods of form positioning. However, this requires sufficient friction in the forms feed path (exerted by feed rollers, platen, etc.) to ensure that the form will not move when the motor excitation is disconnected. The other alternative is to retain power on the motor continuously, which tends to be wasteful of power. The alternative scheme presented herein is to apply low duty cycle pulse excitation to the stepper motor for actively holding it stationary. The low duty cycle reduces power consumption. Furthermore, the repetition period of these pulses is varied continuously with the result that resonance effects associated with any particular frequency of stepper excitation would be avoided, and undesirable acoustic effects accompanying such resonances would be eliminated or radically reduced. Referring to Fig. 1, stepper motor 1 receives its drive excitation from drive network 2 which is supervised by single-chip microprocessor 3. The microprocessor communicates with a printer control unit (PCU) 4 which supervises printing and forms feed operations, and actively controls the motor 1 by applying phased pulses to the stepping control leads 5 of drive network 2 and other pulses (not presently relevant) to "pedestal" control lead 6 of that network. With suitably varying phase combinations at the leads 5 the motor is actuated to create forms advancing motion, and with constant relative pulse phasing at 5 the motor shaft is held stationary. In order to conserve power when the motor is being held stationary, excitation delivered...