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Bulk Removal Fixture for Diced Semiconductor Wafers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047198D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kemer, EL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This is a fixture capable of performing bulk removal in single transfer operations, thereby eliminating handling damage. The potential to eliminate pre- and post-handling of the diced wafer and devices is also present in this fixture. Semiconductor devices (chips) are removed from the diced wafer form in bulk (i.e., all devices are separated from the dicing tape before electrical test). The current bulk removal process utilizes multiple fixtures, necessitating numerous transfer operations. Each transfer operation exposes the devices to handling damage. The fixture, as illustrated in Fig. 1, consists of two parts: a base 10 and a cover 20. The base 10, shown in cross-section in Fig. 2, accepts the diced wafer still attached to the backing tape. The cover 20, shown in cross-section in Fig.

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Bulk Removal Fixture for Diced Semiconductor Wafers

This is a fixture capable of performing bulk removal in single transfer operations, thereby eliminating handling damage. The potential to eliminate pre- and post-handling of the diced wafer and devices is also present in this fixture. Semiconductor devices (chips) are removed from the diced wafer form in bulk
(i.e., all devices are separated from the dicing tape before electrical test). The current bulk removal process utilizes multiple fixtures, necessitating numerous transfer operations. Each transfer operation exposes the devices to handling damage. The fixture, as illustrated in Fig. 1, consists of two parts: a base 10 and a cover 20. The base 10, shown in cross-section in Fig. 2, accepts the diced wafer still attached to the backing tape. The cover 20, shown in cross-section in Fig. 3, is then mated to the base, forming the bulk removal fixture. Integral to both the base and the cover is a fine mesh whose size is suitable to allow dicing chafe to pass through and out of the fixture but confining the devices to the fixture. In addition, the base and cover are placed a minimum distance apart to prevent vertical movement of the devices. The base 10 also contains a cut-out to provide zero-drop height transfer of the devices from the bulk removal fixture to the vibratory bowl. The fixture material should be constructed with a low function coating, such as TEFLON*, to further insure device handling safety. In sum...