Browse Prior Art Database

Module Clean Room

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047265D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Horky, GJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Clean rooms are normally expensive to fabricate and require an excessive length of time for setting up into a manufacturing line. The Module Clean Room (MCR) illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 (plan and side profile views, respectively) meets this need while providing the clean environment required to assemble our most critical manufacturing products. As shown, the room provides conventional Class 100 clean air to Federal Standard 209B and can control the temperature and humidity to 72Œ+/- 2 and 35% to 55% RH, respectively. The MCR will have an entrance/change room area with push-button operated sliding doors for operator ease on entry. Window pass throughs will be provided on each side of the room, East and West, to allow for future expansion (Fig. 1).

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Module Clean Room

Clean rooms are normally expensive to fabricate and require an excessive length of time for setting up into a manufacturing line. The Module Clean Room (MCR) illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 (plan and side profile views, respectively) meets this need while providing the clean environment required to assemble our most critical manufacturing products. As shown, the room provides conventional Class 100 clean air to Federal Standard 209B and can control the temperature and humidity to 72OE+/- 2 and 35% to 55% RH, respectively. The MCR will have an entrance/change room area with push-button operated sliding doors for operator ease on entry. Window pass throughs will be provided on each side of the room, East and West, to allow for future expansion (Fig. 1). The North wall will be a perforated blank wall with a rack/bin configuration that can accept a conveyor system or other types of material-handling systems. In the case of a laboratory installation, this space can remain blank or be incorporated into the room itself (Fig. 2). The floor in the MCR is raised for returning air circulation back into the MCR air conditioning unit. The MCR has been designed to a standard 10-foot width; this, in turn, conforms to existing handler, robotics and parts supply concepts. The spacing also allows the use of the ergonomic manual workstations or a variety of automated test equipment. In practice, the assembly area will consist of MCRs placed wherever the process dicta...