Browse Prior Art Database

Touch-Sensitive Overlay Selection Repeater

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047301D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cole, AG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Duplicating a selection from a displayed list may permit feedback of greater than usual resolution and obviates the problem of obscuring the display by a blunt pointer, such as a finger. A document is displayed (Fig. 1) on a CRT which has a touch panel overlay, so that the position of the finger can be sensed as the user touches the surface of the screen. For gross positioning (e.g., picking a word) the user points directly at the word and feedback is given, for example, by brightening the word. This feedback is directly noticed by the user as a brightening of any part of the word to the sides of his finger. (The word could be encircled so as not to be hidden by the finger.) However, for fine positioning (e.g.

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Touch-Sensitive Overlay Selection Repeater

Duplicating a selection from a displayed list may permit feedback of greater than usual resolution and obviates the problem of obscuring the display by a blunt pointer, such as a finger. A document is displayed (Fig. 1) on a CRT which has a touch panel overlay, so that the position of the finger can be sensed as the user touches the surface of the screen. For gross positioning (e.g., picking a word) the user points directly at the word and feedback is given, for example, by brightening the word. This feedback is directly noticed by the user as a brightening of any part of the word to the sides of his finger. (The word could be encircled so as not to be hidden by the finger.) However, for fine positioning (e.g., picking a character within a word) or for moving a cursor at finer than character resolution, the feedback might be hidden by the finger if brightening or encircling were done. This technique duplicates the word or image above the finger when fine positioning is required.

This permits the user to point directly to the character and gives direct feedback as to where the system senses the pointer to be. The character in the original position is brightened additionally, and remains brightened as the user's finger is removed, but the duplicate image would no longer be displayed (Fig. 2).

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