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Linewidth Control by Orthogonal Exposures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047324D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gillespie, SJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a process for making a photoresist line or a set of photoresist lines having linewidth variations of predetermined width and at preselected locations using E-beam lithography. This is accomplished by exposing with an E-beam a first line or a first set of lines on a layer of photoresist in a given direction and exposing at the same or lower dose, another line or set of lines on the layer of photoresist in an orthogonal direction to the initial line or set of lines and at the locations where the linewidth variations are desired. The incident beamwidth and the exposure dose are constant along the length of each set of lines. For example, as shown in Figs.

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Linewidth Control by Orthogonal Exposures

This article describes a process for making a photoresist line or a set of photoresist lines having linewidth variations of predetermined width and at preselected locations using E-beam lithography. This is accomplished by exposing with an E-beam a first line or a first set of lines on a layer of photoresist in a given direction and exposing at the same or lower dose, another line or set of lines on the layer of photoresist in an orthogonal direction to the initial line or set of lines and at the locations where the linewidth variations are desired. The incident beamwidth and the exposure dose are constant along the length of each set of lines. For example, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, this process includes exposing a set of lines in a vertical direction (see indications of the locations where width variations are desired), and exposing the original pattern in a horizontal direction (in this example at a lower dose and a narrower beamwidth) at the locations where the width variation is desired. Fig. 3 shows the resulting pattern in the photoresist after development. In one example the vertical exposure was at 20 mC/cm2 (micro-Coulombs per centimeter square) and the horizontal exposure was at 5 mC/cm2 . The development time was 2 minutes. Among the advantages of this process are: the use of a constant incident beamwidth and a constant exposure dose along any set of lines; the orthogonal beamwidth and the orthogonal exposure...