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Thin Silicon Nitride Layers Formed by Both Thermal Growth and Chemical Vapor Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047328D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pan, PH: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a method for forming thin silicon nitride layers on silicon that have both the preferred silicon nitride/silicon interface characteristics that can only be obtained through the thermal growth of silicon nitride on silicon and the thickness that can only be practically achieved through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or low pressure CVD (LPCVD) process. Silicon nitride is often preferable to silicon dioxide for charge storage applications because of its dielectric constant which is higher than that of silicon dioxide. Silicon nitride can be formed on silicon either through a thermal growth or through a chemical vapor deposition process (CVD or LPCVD).

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Thin Silicon Nitride Layers Formed by Both Thermal Growth and Chemical Vapor Deposition

This article describes a method for forming thin silicon nitride layers on silicon that have both the preferred silicon nitride/silicon interface characteristics that can only be obtained through the thermal growth of silicon nitride on silicon and the thickness that can only be practically achieved through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or low pressure CVD (LPCVD) process. Silicon nitride is often preferable to silicon dioxide for charge storage applications because of its dielectric constant which is higher than that of silicon dioxide. Silicon nitride can be formed on silicon either through a thermal growth or through a chemical vapor deposition process (CVD or LPCVD). However, the methods for thermally growing silicon nitride (either through thermal nitridation by heating the silicon in the presence of NH3 gas or plasma and thermal nitridation by heating silicon in the presence of plasma NH3) are too slow for applications requiring silicon nitrides of more than 30-50 ~. Also, the methods for depositing silicon nitride through CVD or LPCVD produce silicon nitride on silicon that has C-V characteristics which are unacceptable for many charge storage applications and they permit the growth of native silicon dioxide between the silicon nitride layer and silicon which reduces the total capacitance of the structure. The method disclosed in this article results in the formatio...