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Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Station Point-To-Point Protocol

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047367D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gergaud, CJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

For security reasons, many customers duplicate their data processing centers and want to establish between these two centers high speed communications in the range of several megabits per second. Generally, several processors are located in location A and several processors are located in location B. The requirement is that any processor can communicate with any other one located in the same location or in a remote location. A solution to this problem is proposed here. In location A, several processors A1 to An are connected to a loop in such a way that any processor A can communicate with any processor A. On top of that, the loop is connected through the modem M and the high speed link to a multi-drop line in the remote location B. On the multi-drop line are connected the processors B1 to Bn.

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Multi-Station Point-To-Point Protocol

For security reasons, many customers duplicate their data processing centers and want to establish between these two centers high speed communications in the range of several megabits per second. Generally, several processors are located in location A and several processors are located in location B. The requirement is that any processor can communicate with any other one located in the same location or in a remote location. A solution to this problem is proposed here. In location A, several processors A1 to An are connected to a loop in such a way that any processor A can communicate with any processor A. On top of that, the loop is connected through the modem M and the high speed link to a multi-drop line in the remote location B. On the multi-drop line are connected the processors B1 to Bn. When a message is sent on the loop from a processor A, this message is also sent on the multi-drop line and reaches all processors B. This configuration allows any processor A to send a message to any processor A or processor B. The same configuration exists in location B so that any processor B can communicate with any processor B or A. On the local loop all processors are both transmitter and receiver, and on the local multi-drop line all processors are receivers only. The message format is as follows: F1 AD C AO D1 D D D D D Dn K K F2

F1 SDLC flag

F2 Go-ahead flag (see SDLC loop protocol)

AD Destination address

AO Origin address

C Co...