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Auxiliary Mass Damping of Disk-File Sliders

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047441D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nayak, JH: AUTHOR

Abstract

The spectrum of relative vibration between the slider and the disk in a disk-file is very wide. It extends from 60H to about 30KH. The high end of this spectrum, from about 10KH to 30KH, corresponds to the pitch, roll and vertical natural frequencies of the slider bearing. These high frequency vibrations of the slider cannot be damped well by damping the suspension. Neither is it feasible to increase the low amount of damping of the slider bearing itself. This disclosure provides the means by which these high frequency vibrations of the slider can be damped. The key concept of the disclosure is as follows: Auxiliary masses supported on a layer of viscoelastic material are bonded on top of the slider, as shown in the figure 1. The viscoelastic layer acts both as a spring as well as a damper.

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Auxiliary Mass Damping of Disk-File Sliders

The spectrum of relative vibration between the slider and the disk in a disk-file is very wide. It extends from 60H to about 30KH.

The high end of this spectrum, from about 10KH to 30KH, corresponds to the pitch, roll and vertical natural frequencies of the slider bearing. These high frequency vibrations of the slider cannot be damped well by damping the suspension. Neither is it feasible to increase the low amount of damping of the slider bearing itself.

This disclosure provides the means by which these high frequency vibrations of the slider can be damped. The key concept of the disclosure is as follows: Auxiliary masses supported on a layer of viscoelastic material are bonded on top of the slider, as shown in the figure 1. The viscoelastic layer acts both as a spring as well as a damper. Slider vibrations give rise to vibrations in the auxiliary system which get damped due to the presence of the viscoelastic layer. Thus a part of the kinetic energy of the slider during its vibration will be dissipated. This effectively damps out slider vibrations. The auxiliary mass and the damper/spring are designed so as to act as a tuned vibration absorber.

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